As an archaeologist I have conducted research in the San Pedro Valley for close to three decades.

With regard to cultural properties, the San Pedro Valley is perhaps the richest, densest, most diverse, and most important area in Arizona.

This valley was roamed by historical giants, including explorer Francisco Vasquez de Coronado and Father Eusebio Kino. It was investigated by
scholarly giants such as Adolf Bandelier, Byron Cummings, Emil Haury, and Charles Di Peso. The San Pedro Valley was occupied by the giant
mammoths who were hunted by the Clovis people, and by varied cultures all the way through to the Tombstone and Hollywood giants at the OK
Corral.

Here in the Southwest we value remote areas without the sounds and sights of the modern world. These are values worth preserving.

--Deni Seymour, PhD, Research Archaeologist

THE SAN PEDRO VALLEY--ITS VALUES, ITS LEGACY
The Material on This Page Is Copyrighted and Should Be Appropriately Cited (C) 2013-2015, Deni Seymour
For me, the most interesting part of this extended occupation is that which falls in the terminal prehistoric and historic periods. The Spanish coloinal
period encompasses only a portion of this interval. And while my recent excavation of mission and presidio sites demonstrate that there is much more
to be learned about this period, it is the indigenous occupation that has led and will continue to lead to the most imprortant discoveries. Our notions
have been so incorrect and confused regarding these groups that once we understand them we will then begin to understand the end of prehistory, the
colonial process, culture change, and a whole range of issues centering on this time period.

Native American sites from this interval are abundant on the San Pedro and include the river-based farming group the Sobaipuri-O'odham, the ancestral
Apache (mostly ancestral Chiricahua Apache), and the Jocome, Jano, Manso, and Suma, as well as other non-Apache mobile peoples mentioned in
the Spanish chronicles. We have found dozens of new sites and assessed the character of several more previously recorded sites. The evidence is
difficult to see because it occurs in such low frequencies and represents such a light footprint. Moreover, it is often found on sites occupied by earlier
peoples making it even more difficult to distinguish. Below I list the site numbers of all the known and recently reassessed "protohistoric" sites on the
San Pedro. As part of this update we are adding over 50 new site numbers to the database, many of which are on the San Pedro.
MIDDLE SAN PEDRO
EE:8:15
EE:8:283
EE:8:284
EE:8:424
EE:8:425
EE:4:11
EE:4:25
EE:4:34
EE:4:38
EE:4:169
EE:4:5
EE:4:21
EE:4:23
EE:4:26
EE:4:29
EE:4:30
EE:4:31
EE:4:32
EE:4:35
EE:4:36
EE:4:37
EE:4:170
EE:4:168
EE:4:9 (BLM)
TRES ALAMOS CLUSTER
BB:15:86
BB:15:87
BB:15:88
BB:15:57
BB:15:51
BB:15:
BB:15:
BB:15:
BB:15:
BB:15:
BB:15:
BB:15:
BB:15:25
LOWER SAN PEDRO
BB:6:
BB:6:
BB:7:
BB:7:
BB:11:
BB:11:
BB:11:
BB:11:
BB:11:
BB:11:1
BB:6:9
BB:6:
BB:2:6:
BB:11:90
BB:11:20
BB:11:19
BB:11:45
BB:11:22
BB:11:61
BB:11:36
BB:2:108
BB:2:142
BB:6:132
BB:6:155
BB:11:148
BB:11:108
BB:6:110
BB:6:114
BB:2:31
All sites are preceeded by AZ, and all but the one indicated are ASM numbers.
Those without site numbers are indicated by partial numbers.