LA 109599--The Bead Site
THE MATERIAL ON THIS PAGE IS COPYRIGHTED AND SHOULD BE APPROPRIATELY CITED (C) 2007-2008, Deni Seymour
ARTIFACTS
Photograph of two sides of a blue glass, drawn, fasceted bead recovered from the west end of the site.
Typical Cerro Rojo perforator.
This type of scraper, which may have been a
flesher, have been found on reservation period
Mescalero sites and ancestral Apache sites.
These retouched bifaces represent the relatively unrefined nature of this complex.
This finely reduced and retouched biface
fragment is from the midsection of what may
have been a Cerro Rojo complex knife. Long,
narrow, nicely retouched knifes are typical of
the Cerro Rojo complex in contrast to those of
other mobile groups which tend to be ovate
and other shapes.
This steep-edge end scraper, with retouch
along one margin, was made on a small
nodule that was probably found on site.
This site was originally recorded during a contract project but has since grown more than three times its
original size. Additional thermal features, storage features, and rock structural rings are present. The
accompanying map shows the distibution of these features across the site.
This small thermal feature is situated outside
and near the structural feature shown to the
left.
A loose arrangement of cobbles and boulders
that from the right angle looks relatively
circular. The flat cleared interior and
associated artifacts provide further suggestion
that this is a house ring.
Undisturbed feature thought to have been
used for storage.
This thermal feature is situated outside and
near the structural feature shown to the left.
This small structure shows the range of sizes
present at this single site.
This tipi ring is situated on the ridge
edge, overlooking the Pecos River.
Thermal feature or rock dump
associated with Ring 1.
Each orange flag represents a flaked-stone
artifact, all in a dense scatter in front of
thenentryway and to the east of Ring 1.
Small ring with a couple of rocks inside is similar to features found on Sobaipuri
and ancestral Apache sites in southern Arizona. This may be a gaming feature,
similar to those used in the stick game for the Western Apache. Gambling was a
valued passtime for many different groups.
Disturbed feature thought to have been
used for storage.
Ring 1 is in the center of the site and is one of
the largest and clearest house rings. Artifacts
are present inside and outside of this structure,
in relatively dense frequencies.
Ring 2 is situated 10 m to the north and is
much more vague but still clearly a feature.
This house ring is situated on a bench below
and to the north of the rest of the site.
Martin Stein draws some of the features on the
west end of the site, to show their dimensions
and relationships.
Another clearly visible house ring.
1
2
1
2
12
16
15
13
14
8
7
10
11
9, gaming feature
6
5
3, 4
31
32
33
34 fcr
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
35 Features total
24
30
29
26
25
35