LA 61247--WIRE HORSE SITE AT BERENDO WASH
THE MATERIAL ON THIS PAGE IS COPYRIGHTED AND SHOULD BE APPROPRIATELY CITED (C) 2007-2008, Deni Seymour
This horse or dog was crafted from bailing wire and was
found among other artifacts that identify it as late Apache.
Some of the glass shows clear signs of retouch to shape the pieces into tools.
The aqua glass suggests a date no earlier than the 1870s.
This late Apache site posesses a wickiup ring and many artifacts. LA 61247 is a useful site for study
because it possesses both stone artifacts and artifacts made of non-native materials, such as metal
and glass. Through time tools and household items made of these later materials replaced many
made of stone, bone, and perishable materials because they were more durable, easier to work, and
were more readily available as ranchos, stage routes, supply roads, sprung up in their territory.
The presence of flaked-stone artifacts that are consistent with specimens found on other
Apache sites, including Reservation period sites further west, lend to the ethnic association. All
but the obsidian flake on the lower right are retouched.
A metal projectile point with a serrated base was found at the site, along with a number of
pieces of metal debitage from the manufacture of this or another point. The debitage is
from a barrel strap, which was a common source of raw material for historic Apachean
groups. The Apache used debris from historic ranch sites to make tools that were often
more durable than their counterparts in stone and other materials.