This reconstructable vessel was found on the west side of the Guadalupe Mountains by Lynn Robinson. Though
originally labeled as a Jornada brownware it is not within that tradition. It is clearly within historic and ancient
Apache territory but this does not make it Apache. The Apache raided and traded with other native residents
and we do not yet understand the full range of pottery variability characteristic of each of these groups,
especially since they recruited new members from neighboring tribes. This vessel has affinities to the Piro and
Tigua mission-made wares of El Paso in thickness, surface treatment, and perhaps paste.

It is rare to find complete or reconstructable vessels from the terminal prehistoric and historic periods in the
southern Southwest. This is because the less pottery was used; instead basketry, skin sacks, and fiber nets
were more common. Many vessels were thinner than their prehistoric counterparts and the general lack of
polishing did not protect the surface. Also, vessels were often fired at lower temperatures making them more
susceptable to breakage so we tend to find sherds. Sites are often on slopes and the sherds wash down slope,
dispersing, making them more difficult to find and then reconstruct.
Interior striations are reminisent of
the interior roughness on
Chupadero and also to the exterior
striations on Alma Scored, but
otherwise there are really no
affinities to these other types.


This partially reconstructed vessel shows it
was a small squat jar with a slightly
outflairing rim.
THE MATERIAL ON THIS PAGE IS COPYRIGHTED AND SHOULD BE APPROPRIATELY CITED (C) 2007-2008, Deni Seymour
Exterior surfaces are quite variable across the vessel suggesting that final appearance was
not that much concern to the maker. This variablity, even on a single vessel, is also what
makes ethnic identification difficult.
Fresh breaks reveal the nature of the paste showing tiny black inclusions.
(The shiny substance is glue.) A sherd of this vessel will be submitted for
INAA and another will be OSL dated.
RECONSTRUCTABLE VESSEL FROM THE GUADALUPE MOUNTAINS